Braune Mann aufgegangen mehrere Korn Sauerteigbrot für Unabhängigkeitstag

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43059/braune-mann-aufgegangen-mehrere-korn-sauerteigbrot-f%C3%BCr-unabh%C3%A4ngigkeitstag

Braune Mann aufgegangen mehrere Korn Sauerteigbrot für Unabhängigkeitstag

Submitted by dabrownman on July 3, 2015 - 11:59am.

If .and it is a big if, Bing Translator works …it means Brownman’s sprouted several grain sourdough bread ……( with a yeast water kicker – which isn’t in the name)

 

I really didn’t think that I could tear Lucy away from her computer this week to come up with a loaf of bread for this Fridays bake. She has been working diligently for a whole week programming something ever since I showed her how to program.

 

She had a great idea for an app, which surprisingly I hadn’t thought of before, mainly because if I wrote it, I would be in jail but…… there aren’t jails for Doxi Dogs who think they are Dobermans - except for the kennel I keep for my Baking Apprentice 2nd Class in…. when she upchucks on my toes or does something her master doesn’t like..

 

Lucy decided to write and app that inactivated all the other apps on the device it was loaded onto and she plans on making money by having people pay her to reactivate their other apps.  I told her we call that extortion and her reply is that it is better than stealing other people’s identities and ruining their lives…. which of course is not really true.

 

We put extortionists in prison for a long time but you can come into the country illegally, steal someone’s identity and SS number to work and, the next thing you know, you are moved to the front of the line to become a citizen.  No worries, no harm done and welcome.   The reasoning must be that you deserve citizenship more than most of the native born folks who no longer have their own identities and can no longer prove it like you can. 

.

So be warned.  If you see an app that says something like - Lucy’s SD (Super Duper) App For Everything - steer clear, keep calm and carry on…. knowing that you were forewarned and kept safe from extortion and who knows what else.  Now, on to this week’s bake.

 

Lucy had forgotten all about yeast water even after I fed it some cherries recently to give it that beautiful summer color we love so much.  We have been doing so much making SD starter from scratch for the weekly bake it was time to go back to a combo leaven by using a dual YW and SD starter.

 

We saved half of last week’s pumpernickel SD starter for this week but didn’t use it to build a small SD levain.  We used 15 grams of our 10 week retarded rye starter instead and whipped up a YW one too.  Both were single stage builds.

 

We used the 25% extracted hard bits that were sifted from sprouted and whole grains in the levains first – so they would be wettest the longest.  Once the levains had doubled, we retarded them for 24 hours.  The grains were a mix of spelt, emmer (farro), Kamut and wheat (no rye since we ran out).

 

Lucy thought we should do a white bread since we were out of that too.  Plus, with smoked meats for the 4th of July a must, you need some white bread.   This one only has 38% whole grains with half being sprouted which makes it solidly, pretty much a wheat white bread.  She also kept the hydration to a reasonable level.  We wanted to do a chacon to celebrate, in a special way, that Cousin Jay was coming over for 4th of July dinner of smoked turkey and pork ribs with the usual fixings.

 

When chacons get too wet, they tend not to crack where designed.  They just spread out and meld together at the seams - a bad state of affairs when chacons have affairs.  We did a bit different process with only 1 set of slap and folds for 8 minutes and then did 4 sets of stretch and folds all on 20 minute intervals.,

 

We then did a very shot bulk ferment of 30 minutes before doing a bulk retard of 10 hours.  The next day, after the design of 2 knots, 2 balls and a braid went into the bottom of the basket, we shaped the rest of the dough into a flat boule and placed it on top.  We let it final proof on the counter for one and quarter hours before preheating Big Old Betsy to 500 F with the combo cooker inside.

 

When the bread went in we turned the oven down to 450 F for 18 minutes of steam and then continued to bake for 15 more minutes at 425 F convection when the lid came off.  We removed the chacon from the bottom of the combo cooker 5 minutes after the lid came off so it could finish baking on the stone without burning the bottom

 

It bloomed and sprang half decent and had some blisters showing on the outside too.  The design for the cracks came through nicely – yea!  We will have to wait ans see how the inside came out later.

 

And don't forget the salad to round out any meal..

 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

%

10 week Retarded Rye Sour

15

2.96%

Spelt

15

2.96%

Farro

15

2.96%

Kamut

15

2.96%

Wheat

17

3.35%

Water

62

12.22%

Total

124

27.39%

 

 

 

YW Levain Buid

Build 1

%

Spelt

15

2.96%

Wheat

15

3.35%

Kamut

15

2.96%

Farro

15

2.96%

Yeast Water

62

12.22%

Total

122

24.43%

 

 

 

SD & YW Levain Totals

 

%

Whole & Sprouted  Flour

131.5

25.91%

Water & YW

131.5

25.91%

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

% Prefermented  Flour

25.91%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

KA Bread Flour

158

31.13%

Whole & Sprouted Grain

60

11.82%

La Fama AP

158

31.13%

Total Dough Flour

376

74.09%

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.97%

Water

272

53.60%

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

507.5

 

Water & YW

403.5

 

 

 

 

Total Hydration w/ Starter & Add ins

79.51%

 

Total Weight

921

 

% Whole & Sprouted Grain

37.73%

 

% Sprouted Grains

18.87%

 

 

 

 

Whole and sprouted grains are equal amounts

 

of:  Kamut. spelt, farro and wheat

 

 

 

 

 

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Durum Potato Rye Ricotta Sourdough Pretzel Rolls

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43058/durum-potato-rye-ricotta-sourdough-pretzel-rolls

Durum Potato Rye Ricotta Sourdough Pretzel Rolls

Submitted by isand66 on July 3, 2015 - 9:26am.

   I've made potato pretzel rolls before and they came out great.  This time I used some fresh milled Durum flour and some fresh ricotta cheese in addition to some rye flour and 00 type flour to make them a little airy.  I probably should have cut back the water around 50 grams but overall these came out real tasty.

I used some cheese and some sesame seeds for topping some of the rolls and traditional pretzel salts as well.

Caution:  When using the Lye make sure you wear gloves, long sleeves and protective eye gear. Also, never add Lye to hot water or it will bubble over and probably burn you.

Closeup1

Main Dough Ingredients for 14 rolls at about 110 grams each or about 13 at 135 grams each

Durum Rye Potato Sourdough Ricotta Pretzel Rolls (%)

Durum Rye Potato Sourdough Ricotta Pretzel Rolls (weights)

For the BreadStorm download file press here.

closeup2

For Lye Bath (3.5% Solution

2 Liters (1836 grams) of Cold water

70 grams Sodium Hydroxide Crystals

Make the Levain

Add your seed starter (20 grams) to the indicated amount of flour and water and mix until incorporated.  Cover and let sit out at room temperature of in your proofer until nice and bubbly around 6-10 hours depending on your temperature.  Use immediately or refrigerate for a few days until ready to mix the main dough.

Procedure

Add the diastatic malt powder to the water and stir.  Add the flours in your mixing bowl and slowly add the water mixture.  Mix for about 1 minute until combined.  Cut your starter in pieces and lay on top of the flour mixture and cover and let rest for 30 minutes to 1 hour so the flour can absorb the water.

Next add the salt, ricotta cheese and potatoes and mix for 6 minutes on low.    Place the dough in a slightly oiled bowl and do a couple of stretch and folds.  Cover the bowl and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold in the bowl and let it rest another 10-15 minutes.  Do another stretch and fold and let the dough sit out in the covered bowl for another 1.5 hours.  Place the dough in the refrigerator until ready to bake the next day.

When ready to bake take the dough out and leave it covered in your bowl for 2 hours.  Next divide the dough into pieces that are 110 grams each or 135 grams for larger rolls .  Shape as rolls and place on a baking sheet and cover with either a moist towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  Let it rest for around 60 minutes to about 1/2 proof.

While the rolls are proofing, fill a large stock pot with 2 liters of cold water.  Measure out the Lye and slowly add it to the cold water.  (DO NOT EVER ADD LYE TO HOT WATER).  Cover the pot and bring it to a rolling boil and then shut off the heat.

Pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees.  When the rolls are proofed sufficiently, prepare to dip them for about 15 seconds in the lye bath upside down.  Let them drain on a bakers rack over a cookie tray covered with a towel or parchment paper.  After draining for a minute you can transfer them to a cookie/baking sheet that has been sprayed with cooking spray.  You want to use a stainless steel cooking sheet as aluminum may react with the lye and peel.  Note: do not ever use parchment paper as the rolls will get stuck to the bottom.  I know this from experience and I had to cut off the bottoms of half the rolls I made.  I actually use my Silpat non-stick sheets which work like a charm.

When ready to bake, score each roll with an "X" on the middle and sprinkle with pretzel salt.  Make sure you use pretzel salt if you want authentic rolls.  As I said previously I used some fresh Parmesan in place of the salt on a few rolls and they were awesome.

Bake for about 15-20 minutes until they are golden brown and register about 200 F in the middle.  Let them cool on a bakers rack until you can't wait any longer!

Note: you cannot store these in a plastic bag or covered really otherwise the salt will react with the moisture in the air and you will end up with soggy tops.  I place them in a paper bag and leave it open so the air circulates.

Enjoy!

Crumbfinal

YellowConeflower

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Pita and the WFO

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43057/pita-and-wfo

Pita and the WFO

Submitted by agmss15 on July 3, 2015 - 8:08am.

Hi all. 

 

I have a mud oven. I have been asked to make a bunch of pita for an event. My problem is in the WFO the difference between too soft and cracker like pitas is seconds. I like a little browning on my pita.

Some of this needs to be me practicing. But I was wondering if any technique or recipe tweaking might help. Any suggestions?

TIA

Amanda

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Thoughts and ideas most welcome

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43056/thoughts-and-ideas-most-welcome

Thoughts and ideas most welcome

Submitted by AbeNW11 on July 3, 2015 - 1:51am.

A pencilled recipe for this weekends sourdough bake. All thoughts, ideas and corrections welcomed. Thank you.

 

Khorasan/Spelt Sourdough

 

 

Ingredients:

Flour 100% [Khorasan 57%, Spelt  43%]

Hydration 65%

Salt 1.8%

Oil 2.6%

 

Khorasan Flour : 285g

Light Spelt Flour : 215g

Water : 298g

Salt : 9g

Coconut Oil : 13g

Mature Whole Rye Starter : 150g @ 100% hydration

 

 

Method:

 

Night before prepare levain by feeding 30g starter with 60g water + 60g whole rye

Next morning autolyse flours + water for 30min

Add salt, oil and levain. Combine and knead for 10-15min

Bulk Ferment till dough feels/looks right (about doubled and feels all airy – I imagine about 3 hours)

Shape into Banneton and either final proof till ready or refrigerate till next day

Bake in pre-heated oven

 

 

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Ancient bread baking in Italy, Cyprus and more

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43055/ancient-bread-baking-italy-cyprus-and-more

Ancient bread baking in Italy, Cyprus and more

Submitted by Ovidius on July 3, 2015 - 12:18am.

Hi all,

This is David Bergwerf from the Netherlands, and I am an enthusiastic amateur sourdough baker.

I am doing some research about interesting bread baking periods before baker's yeast period that begun after 1850. For instance, there seemed to be a flourishing bread culture in Rome where there were 85 different types of bread counted by local authorities. I wonder what kinds of bread were mentioned and how the breads were made, literally from grain to oven. Another story is about Cyprus: in early era many vessels made a quick stop in Cyprus, just because there was superior bread available that could only be found there.  

Is there anyone in this forum that knows more about interesting bread baking periods? Also, if you are just as curious and enthusiastic as I am to know more about this topic and willing to start up a deep search, please contact me!

Happy Baking,

David   

 

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Daily bread...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43054/daily-bread

Daily bread...

Submitted by aliceharlan on July 2, 2015 - 11:29am.

Hi there,

I am starting a new job in September that will mean I need to leave the house before my family get up.

What I want to do, is to be able to put a loaf in the oven (I have an electric oven and a very old aga) for them to take out when they come down for breakfast.

I have a kitchen aid with a dough hook and I love making bread with it, but I can't work out how to time the raising and the proving of this morning loaf, so that it's ready for about 7.45...without me having to be up at 5.30!

I have tried making a batch of dough in the evening and leaving it in the cool of the larde over night, I got up at 6, and knocked it back, then I left it to rise and put it in the oven before I leave at 7.15.

It didn't rise very well and it ended up a bit dense and not cooked in the middle.

What timings and size would you suggest please? I am looking for a small loaf- probably a bit wholemeal.

Thanks!

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Bäckerstärke - is this just potato starch?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43053/b%C3%A4ckerst%C3%A4rke-just-potato-starch

Bäckerstärke - is this just potato starch?

Submitted by four_row on July 2, 2015 - 10:06am.

I have been looking for a good German roll recipe (Brötchen) and this tutorial calls for coating the dough lightly with Bäckerstärke before final proofing so that they turn out nice and shiny.

I know that I can order the stuff from hobbybaecker.de but what exactly is "Bäckerstärke?" I am very curious since I don't remember reading about it in DiMuzio's Bread, or any of the Reinhart books that I have.

(I apologize in advance, the referenced tutorial is entirely in German.)

Thanks,

-Peter

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The Real Tartine Way

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43052/real-tartine-way

The Real Tartine Way

Submitted by FrugalBaker on July 1, 2015 - 11:11pm.

A friend of mine, threw the question of "How could she introduce seeds and grains in bread" to her 11 year old daughter? So I told her, your life saver would be nothing but NUTELLA! (This is what every French kid is eating in France, every morning. My niece was so crazy about it that she basically ate Nutella for breakfast, lunch, tea break and dinner too! I hope she has grown out of this, phew!

Her question inspired me to change my style of baking a bit this week as I needed to show her my ideas on an actual loaf. At this point, am not sure if her daughter would be open enough to accept such concept but when my bread was out of the oven this morning....I was happy with the result. 

 

Not much of  wild activities this time (ears,stretch marks,etc)....everything looked so uniformed, a bit bored to look at.            

So I named it 'An Obedient Brunette'.

 

Crumb Shot (Sorry, could not resist on having a bite before snapping a shot, it would be a crime not to eat it right there, right then!)

 

 

p/s: Baked with a stainless steel pot. Amazon told me that I needed to wait for 2 weeks before I could get my hands on the DO I ordered, bummer! Could hardly wait any longer....

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Crunchy spelt walnut bread

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43050/crunchy-spelt-walnut-bread

Crunchy spelt walnut bread

Submitted by victoriamc on July 1, 2015 - 11:20am.

Spelt (or dinkel if you are from germany) is such a great grain to use in bread baking.  I am having alot of fun, creating lovely nutty flavoursome bread, this one I made extra crunchy and nutty by adding course grain semolina, walnuts and sunflower seeds.  Its a really tasty spelt bread, all the details can be found on mybreadandbrot.com.  Enjoy.

Which other flavours and add-ins do you TFL folks like to include in spelt bread recipes?

 I am currently working on a 100% whole grain spelt bread with spelt flakes, I hope it will be up next.

greetings all

Victoria

 

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