SD starter being gummy?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52927/sd-starter-being-gummy

SD starter being gummy?

Submitted by JessicaT on September 21, 2017 - 9:35am.

Here's a question for you guys. I typically feed my starter with rye flour. At the request of a friend, she asked that I feed it with whole wheat flour instead. I've noticed a weird texture difference between the two. Is it normal for the whole wheat starter to be super gummy? I have the hydration at 100% for that. My experience with white and whole wheat flour is that it usually tends to be more soupy, rather than gummy as opposed to the rye, which is light and fluffy. 

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Overfermented? insufficient gluten development?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52924/overfermented-insufficient-gluten-development

Overfermented? insufficient gluten development?

Submitted by leslieruf on September 21, 2017 - 1:21am.

For this bake I wanted to use the Bob's Red Mill hot cereal mix that I had in the freezer.  Inspiration from Danni3113  who has made some great porridge mix breads.

8 am mix

Hot cereal mix  117 gm 

170 gm boiling water.

Cover and leave on bench until I got home 

2 pm autolyse 1 hour

466 gm bread flour

203 gm water - too dry so added another 50 gm, total 253 gm

Edit: include cereal mix in autolyse

3 pm

Add 12 gm salt and 

 262 gm 100% hydration rye levain and knead. 

A bit worried about sticky dough so added scant tspn gluten (a questionable move I think) and a good tspn honey as I thought maybe dough could do with a touch of sweetening.  

Dough was sticky and slack but I continued with 4 sets slap and fold/stretch and folds every 30 minutes. Room temperature 22°c at start of Bulk ferment

8 pm dough doubled so divided in two, preshaped and rested for 15 minutes.  Final shaping then into fridge overnight.

7 am today popped them into preheated DOs in the oven 15 minutes lid on at 230°c 18 minutes lid off.

 

At same time did a 1:2:3 loaf (back loaf in photo) with a mix of bread flour 70%/ multigrain flour 20%/spelt flour 10%. similar time frames except it used a bread flour levain and took longer to bulk ferment. Dough required 50 gm more water and was a pretty firm dough.  Baked after the porridge loaves.

 

Well, that gave me 2 totally different looking loaves.  Were the porridge loaves over fermented?  they spread and didn't get the oven spring I hoped for! or was dough strength just not enough to support ovenspring?   

 Crumb shot  comparison

the other two loaves

Crumb is good, so I just don't know....... 

Leslie

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Billowy v. Overfermented

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52923/billowy-v-overfermented

Billowy v. Overfermented

Submitted by WatertownNewbie on September 20, 2017 - 9:01pm.

Today I began Field Blend #2 (from Forkish's FWSY).  Kitchen temp was a nice 74 F, and dough temp after initial mixing was 78 F.  I included the instant yeast along with my levain and kept an eye on the dough (as so often advised and after naively following Forkish's lengthy bulk fermentation time estimate with a previous bake).  Four S&F sessions spaced through the first two-plus hours tightened up the dough, and then I let the process continue.  After a little under four hours I had a nice billowy dough, which I then divided, pre-shaped, paused for a bench rest, final shaped, put into bannetons, and then put into the refrigerator (where the loaves now sit for baking tomorrow).

Baking from FWSY has definitely forced me to pay attention to time and temperature, but as a newbie I also lack the experience to recognize signs that others who post here would notice.  Watching the dough rise got me thinking about the aim to achieve billowy dough versus the aim to avoid overfermenting.

What are the things the rest of you look for in sensing that your dough is not yet overfermented?  The finger (or poke) test works nicely for proofing, but is there an equivalent for the bulk fermentation?  Is billowy the point at which to divide and pre-shape?  In Tartine, Chad Robertson writes about looking for a cohesive mass, bubbles on the side of the container, ridges that hold their shape a bit after a S&F (among other things).

Thanks for any helpful hints.

Ted

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Sourdough Bialys with Whole Wheat

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52922/sourdough-bialys-whole-wheat

Sourdough Bialys with Whole Wheat

Submitted by isand66 on September 20, 2017 - 12:28pm.

      This is a new version of a recipe I made a while ago.  I replaced around 30% of the high gluten flour with fresh milled and sifted whole wheat flour and used First Clear flour instead of High Gluten flour.  I added some cheese on top of some of them just to make it interesting.  I also added some extra water which the thirsty whole wheat gobbled up.

For the water in the main dough I used ice water.

I was very happy how this one turned out.  They tasted fantastic with an extra flavor boost from the whole wheat flour.  My favorite way to eat these is with a schmeer of whipped cream cheese and toasted.

The original post is here.

I also made a potato pizza a few weeks ago which came out great.  I sliced some Yukon gold potatoes real thin and let them seep in hot water to soften a bit.  I added some white cheddar and smoked Gruyere along with some caramelized onions as well.  Very tasty!

Formula for Bialys

Download BreadStorm .bun file here.

Levain Directions

Step 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Onion Poppy Seed Filling

45 grams Dehydrated Onions

340 grams Boiling Water

14 grams Vegetable Oil

10 grams Black Poppy Seeds

4 grams (1/4 tsp.) Sea Salt

Add the boiling water to the onions and stir and let them sit for around 30 minutes or longer.  Next strain them out and spread them on a piece of paper towel.  Wring out as much water as you can.

Mix the onions with the remaining ingredients and refrigerate until ready to use.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the ice water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the starter and  salt and mix on low for 5 minutes and speed #2 for another 3 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  Let the dough rise until it is doubled in size.  I used my proofer and it took around 5 hours.  (Note: I did not make a fresh starter but used part of my mother starter I had refreshed a few days before which is why it probably took so long.)

When the dough is ready, divide into 12 pieces that are 85 grams each and shape them into round rolls shapes.  Let them rest on a parchment covered baking sheet and cover with sprayed plastic wrap or a moist lint free towel(s).  Let the shaped dough proof until they are doubled in size and the poke test leaves a nice indent.  You almost want them to over-proof otherwise they will puff up too much which you don't want.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Once they are proofed sufficiently take each ball in your hand and place your two thumbs in the middle and stretch the dough so the center is paper thin and the outside has a nice thick rim.  It's almost like making a mini pizza.

Next, place a teaspoon of the onion filling in the middle of each shaped bialy and place in your oven.   Place the cup of boiling water into the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes until the bialys are nice and brown.

Enjoy!

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Steel 3D printed replacement upgrade part for Panasonic bread maker dispenser ADA44E165-H0

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52921/steel-3d-printed-replacement-upgrade-part-panasonic-bread-maker-dispenser-ada44e165h0

Steel 3D printed replacement upgrade part for Panasonic bread maker dispenser ADA44E165-H0

Submitted by Wital on September 20, 2017 - 2:28am.

Which used in models: SD-2500, SD-2501, SD-2511, SD-ZB2502, SD-ZB2512.

Original plastic latch of nut/raisin dispenser door is cracked by itself after two years using our bread maker(this dispencer was not used). There is known common problem with original plastic latches as they crack due hi temperatures etc. and not available as separate part from Panasonic(only with dispenser assembly ADA44E165-H0). I don't see reason to buy new whole dispenser every time just for same new plastic latch which also will crack after some time. I made precision size model of original latch and it's better print it in durable steel and forget about cracked plastic :). This short video shows how it work:




 

Shapeways now have promotion till September 24 11:59PM PDT, all orders over $25 ship free anywhere in the world!

You can buy it here:

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Sept 15: 66% Whole Grain Porridge Loaves

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52920/sept-15-66-whole-grain-porridge-loaves

Sept 15: 66% Whole Grain Porridge Loaves

Submitted by IceDemeter on September 19, 2017 - 8:31pm.

Thanks to the influence of Isand66 and danni3ll3 and dabrownman (among others), I seem to have become somewhat hooked on the textures and flavours created by adding a cooked porridge made with toasted grains.  Since I wasn't sure how my "challenge" rolls would taste, I still wanted a moist and flavourful loaf for our sandwiches, and went with one of my favourite techniques:

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

90

90

 

 

10.18

Water

72

 

 

72.00

8.14

TOASTED ADDERS

 

 

 

 

 

Steelcut Oats

20

20

 

 

2.26

Rye Flakes

20

20

 

 

2.26

Barley Flakes

20

20

 

 

2.26

Wheat Germ

20

20

 

 

2.26

Oat Bran

20

20

 

 

2.26

Whole Millet

20

20

 

 

2.26

PORRIDGE (made w/ toasties)

 

 

 

 

Non-fat Dry Milk Powder

40

 

 

 

4.52

Full Fat Sour Cream

60

 

74.5

44.70

6.79

Water

158

 

 

158.00

17.87

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

105

105

 

 

11.88

Fresh Milled Hard Red Wheat

105

105

 

 

11.88

Spelt

150

150

 

 

16.97

Red Rye Malt

7

7

 

 

0.79

White Rye Malt

7

7

 

 

0.79

Salt

13

 

 

 

1.47

All Purpose Flour

300

300

 

 

33.94

Water

400

 

 

400.00

45.25

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

1627

 

 

 

184.05

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

884

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

674.70

76.32

 

LEVAIN: Use 8g of 65% hydration durum starter from fridge and do a 3-stage build up to highly active 162g of 80% hydration levain (90g of durum / 72g water). Plan to use shortly after peak on 3rd feed (refrigerate at peak and hold overnight)

PORRIDGE:
Toast 20g each of millet, steel-cut oats, oat bran, wheat germ, rye flakes, and barley flakes over medium heat.
Add 280g of boiling water to 40g of dry milk powder and 60g of sour cream. Whisk until fully blended. Set aside extra hot water.
Remove pan with grains from heat, and carefully pour in about 3/4 of the hot water mixture. Stir until it is fully absorbed. Add the rest of the liquid, and return pan to medium-low heat, cooking until reaches soft and creamy consistency. Remove from heat and set aside to cool to room temperature.

AUTOLYSE:
Mix together 105g of freshly milled whole hard red wheat, 150g of whole spelt, 105g of freshly milled whole durum, 300g AP flour, 7g diastatic rye malt, 7g red rye malt, and 400g of water in to a shaggy mass. Cover and let rest for 2 hours.

DOUGH:
Add levain and 13g salt to the autolyse. Knead for about 10 minutes (minimal gluten development), then cover and let rest for 20 minutes.
Knead again (about 300 turns) up to medium gluten development, adding water if needed. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.
Transfer dough to wet work surface, and do 2 full sets of stretch-and-fold. Roll in to tight ball, cover, and let rest for 30 minutes.
Weigh out the now cooled porridge to determine how much water was used. Spread out dough on wet work surface, and spread out the porridge over top as evenly as possible. Incorporate the porridge using a few sets of letter folds. Do a dozen or so slap-and-folds if needed to get it fully incorporated. Transfer to clear fermenting container, cover, and let rest for 30 minutes.
Do two more sets of stretch-and-fold in the container on 30 minute intervals, then transfer container to the refrigerator overnight.

PRE-SHAPE, SHAPE, PROOF, BAKE:

Once dough has fully fermented in the fridge, transfer it to a clean work surface, divide in to two equal sized pieces, and pre-shape both in to rough logs. Cover and allow to bench rest for 30-60 minutes.

Lightly dust work surface with flour, then flip, de-gas, and stitch / shape in to final loaf shapes. Transfer to bannetons, one covered in a damp towel and allowed to proof on the counter, and the other covered by a plastic bag and placed back in the fridge for an hour.  After the hour, put it on the counter to finish proofing as well.

Preheat oven to 475 degrees F with roaster inside.

Once dough is fully proofed, score then transfer to roaster. Bake covered at 450 degrees for 25 minutes, then uncovered at 425 degrees for 25 minutes (to internal temperature of 200-202 degrees). Transfer to cooling racks to cool completely, while returning roaster to oven and again pre-heating to 475 degrees F.  Repeat with second dough once it has fully proofed and oven is hot.

Do not cover loaves until fully cooled (at least 6 hours) and do not slice until next day.

On all previous bakes with this much dough, I have shaped and baked it as a single loaf.  With some conversations about shaping and scoring here in the fora recently, I decided to split this attempt in to two loaves, to see if it made any difference to the shaping and scoring.  Well - what a difference!  Getting a good shape, with a tight skin, is much easier with less dough --- and the scoring works better with that tighter skin.

I still wasn't feeling great, so didn't think about getting pictures of both loaves until the next day when I was slicing one up for sandwiches:

While I was very happy with the shaping and scoring, I was over the moon with our idea of a "perfect" crumb for sandwiches:

This loaf was first sliced on Saturday --- and I had the last slice from it this morning.  It was stored in a plastic bag on the counter, and it was so moist and fresh-tasting still this morning that I enjoyed it plain --- not toasted, and no toppings.  The second loaf came out just as good, and is more than 3/4 gone in sandwiches and nibbling.  The last bits are in the freezer, but I doubt that they'll be there for long...

For a few days when I wasn't feeling well, it sure was nice to have the bakes fall so nicely in to place.  Hoping that all of your bakes work out so well, too, and that you still manage to bake happy (even if a wee bit under the weather)...

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Sept 14 - a fun challenge (thanks, Leslieruf!)

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52919/sept-14-fun-challenge-thanks-leslieruf

Sept 14 - a fun challenge (thanks, Leslieruf!)

Submitted by IceDemeter on September 19, 2017 - 8:08pm.

A couple of weeks back, leslieruf posted another gorgeous bake http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/387329#comment-387329 , and in the conversation about it issued a challenge for a one-day bake – to see whether “good” flavour could be built that quickly. 

 Obviously, “good” flavour is a matter of opinion.  My personal preference is for a very strong sour (far more than most folks like), and I most often use a variety of whole grains to give a lot of depth to the flavour (so it’s not just sour).   My husband, on the other hand, prefers a sweeter note from the leaven.  I wasn’t too sure about my ability to build my preference in flavour so quickly, and I didn’t want our “daily bread” to be less flavourful than usual, so I decided to try the challenge with a couple of roll formulas that I had used before, and then do more “usual” porridge bread for our “daily”.

 The original roll recipes were for an oat khorasan (kamut) mix for my husband (see original blog here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52425/catching-myself-oat-kamut-rolls-july-7), and a rye pumpkin roll for me (see original blog here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52515/aug-4-rolls-can-be-baked-while-crutches). 

 The main changes on the oat khorasan rolls were to use my oat starter to create the oat levain (instead of the durum starter used the first time), and to change the timing so that the levain and poolish were both mixed at 7:00 a.m., and then were mixed in to the main dough around 12:30 p.m. --- and were in the oven by 3:30 p.m. (talk about quick!).

 I decided to change up the flours and hydration a bit on the pumpkin rye rolls (they were nasty to work with even after a cold retard with the original formula), and came up with this:

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

 

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Rye

124

124

 

 

15.70

 

Water

104

 

 

104.00

13.16

 

POOLISH

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dark Rye

100

100

 

 

12.66

 

Skim Milk at 100 deg F

100

 

90.8

90.80

12.66

 

Active Dry Yeast (pinch)

0.5

 

 

 

0.06

 

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Hard Red

216

216

 

 

27.34

 

Pumpkin Puree

270

 

90

243.00

34.18

 

Blackstrap Molasses

20

 

21.9

4.38

2.53

 

Maple Syrup

20

 

32.1

6.42

2.53

 

Dry Milk Powder

60

 

 

 

7.59

 

Lemon Zest

5

 

 

 

0.63

 

Ginger, dried ground

4

 

 

 

0.51

 

Coriander, dried, ground

4

 

 

 

0.51

 

White Rye Malt

6

 

 

 

0.76

 

Red Rye Malt

4

 

 

 

0.51

 

Sage, dried, ground

4

 

 

 

0.51

 

Tarragon, dried, ground

4

 

 

 

0.51

 

Onions, dehydrated

40

 

 

 

5.06

 

Salt

14

 

 

 

1.77

 

All Purpose Flour

350

350

 

 

44.30

 

Active Dry Yeast (1/4 tsp)

1

 

 

 

0.13

 

Water

120

 

 

120.00

15.19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

1570.5

 

 

 

198.80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

790

 

 

100.00

 

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

568.60

71.97

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Split in to even pieces

20.0

79

 

 

 

 

Poolish and levain started at 7:30 a.m. - dough mix at noon.

 

 

 

Really stiff dough, even with the 100g of water.  Have another 40 ready if needed.

 

First mix to shaggy mass, then cover and rest for 5 minutes.

 

 

 

Realize haven't put in enough levain, so go back and add it, along with another 20g water.

First real knead is 200 turns, from 12:30 to 12:40.  Cover and rest.

 

 

Second knead is 100 turns, from 1:00 to 1:03.  Place in to ferment bowl, in oven with light on.

Rest for 60 minutes, then do stretch and fold, and again put in oven for 60 minutes.

 

Almost doubled by 3:00, so divided and pre-shaped, then let rest for 10 minutes.

 

Shaped and on to pans by 3:30.  Baked at 4:30

 

 

 

 

 

 

It worked out that I had chosen a good time for this experiment, since our temps were finally down to a reasonable 22 deg C. and there even was some humidity. Unfortunately, I ended up starting to not feel well as the last rolls went in to the oven.  The best-of-all-husbands stepped in to take them out of the oven, get them cooled over the evening, and then split and wrapped them and got them in to the freezer…  well – except for the 4 of the oat khorasan ones that he had for dinner!

 He unfortunately didn’t take any pics for me (all I have is one that I thought of at the last minute when I was making sandwiches a couple of days later):

 

I still had a couple of each roll recipe in the freezer from the original versions that I had baked, so we were able to compare the flavours directly.  We found no difference in the overall flavour, or texture (actually, slightly improved on the pumpkin rye, likely from a more suitable hydration), and I found it quite nice to not have to find refrigerator space for a change!  I was pleasantly surprised that there was still enough sour from the quick levain build to be tasted even with all of the other flavours in the pumpkin rye rolls, since I was positive that my usual 3-stage build with a cold retard of the levain and of the dough would be needed to build enough sour to be noticed.  It’s sometimes quite nice to prove yourself wrong!

 Thanks so much for the “challenge”, Leslie – we both enjoyed the results!

 
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