"Flat shape"

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/49270/flat-shape

"Flat shape"

Submitted by iwchris on September 28, 2016 - 1:44am.

Hi all

I am quite new to bread making and I am quite pleased with the results that I am getting so far except one problem, I am just using easy yeast at the moment, water and flour, plus oil, my problem is that although I am only given it one hour to rise, then one more hour on a baking tray, it spreads out far too much almost overflowing the tray, so the finished loaf although it looks good is far too thin in depth, I have tried using less water but it still did the same, so love to hear any thoughts on this.

Thanks

Chris

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Beans & small grains, Nutrimill vs Wondermill

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/49269/beans-small-grains-nutrimill-vs-wondermill

Beans & small grains, Nutrimill vs Wondermill

Submitted by MontBaybaker on September 27, 2016 - 11:45pm.

Looking at new machines, apparently the Wondermill requires a $22.95 accessory which "allows you to pour beans and small grains (amaranth, quinoa, etc.) all at once, rather than slowly, otherwise these can clog in the mill."  

At a comparable base price, how well does the NutriMill (Classic or Plus) truly handle beans and small grains?  No similar accessory seems needed or manufactured.  Thanks!

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Is it safe to heat active dry yeast to make a substitute for nutritional yeast?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/49268/it-safe-heat-active-dry-yeast-make-substitute-nutritional-yeast

Is it safe to heat active dry yeast to make a substitute for nutritional yeast?

Submitted by Henri on September 27, 2016 - 9:51pm.

Nutritional Yeast isn't available at my location so i'm looking for alternatives.

While searching Seasoned Advice i've found this question How can I make nutritional yeast?. But i don't want exactly to grow nutritional yeast. It's too difficult to it and i need something more practical and less risky in terms of sterelization.

So i've came across this page. Basically it says i can use active dry yeast and toast it to make something that tastes like nutritional yeast. In this The Fresh Loaf post this heating the yeast technique is also mentioned.

Well, i did tried it at home and the result was very very tasty! First time i made it i've dropped a little yeast in a cup with water and sugar and it didn't started fermenting, but the second time i've tried it was still alive.

  1. There is any way to make sure that all the yeast is uniformly dead?
  2. Even if manage to kill all the yeast, let's say, by heating in the oven, is it still safe to eat it? I've read a lot of disquieting stuff on the web about yeast and botulism. (but there might be other factors to consider)
  3. (I must use Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the main ingredient because i want something similar in terms of protein content (about 45g on 100g of yeast)

(This is a duplicate of a question i've asked on Seasoned Advice. But in this forum members are probably more experienced with the subject)

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A Tale Of Two Starters, And A Couple Of Questions

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/49267/tale-two-starters-and-couple-questions

A Tale Of Two Starters, And A Couple Of Questions

Submitted by JamieOF on September 27, 2016 - 8:51pm.

The one on the left is all rye @ 100% hydration and is less than 36 hours old. I'm pleased with it's progress so far. The right one, 1/2 & 1/2 APW and WW @ 100% hydration, I started 5 days ago, but thought I had killed it day before yesterday when I had a brain fart and fed it with tap water. It had absolutely no activity for 24 hours after the tap water, but I fed it again and it's obviously come back to health. (Past 2 weeks we've had water line breaks in our municipality with boil orders in place. I'd guess chlorine levels are probably up so I've normally been using bottled water.

On the left one, you can see a faint black mark, indicating the level when I fed it. On the right one, the rubber band shows the same. Last feeding was ~ 9 hours ago.

My questions are probably answered in one of the hundreds, maybe thousands of guides out there (many that are contradictory) so I'm asking the fine knowledgeable folks here for advice.

  1. In the rye one, 100% hydration makes a paste of a consistency similar to drywall mud, maybe thicker. Will it harm anything if I go higher with water, like 125% or higher to get it thinner?
  2. Once both starters are mature, can I use the same feeding and / or maintenance schedule for both (albeit with proper flours), if only for simplicity? 

As a note, Wifey thinks I've lost it altogether believing I'm going to use this paste to leaven bread. He he he

Good night all, 1:19 AM here and time for bed, or good morning if you're in that part of the world.

Jamie

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Multigrain sourdough

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/49266/multigrain-sourdough

Multigrain sourdough

Submitted by leslieruf on September 27, 2016 - 5:16pm.

 

I decided I needed to check starter activity as it had been untouched in fridge since early August appart from a refresh last week.  I had quite a few grains in the pantry so decided these needed to be used up.  I made my favourite multigrain recipe but made a couple of small changes.  

Built levain in one step just becore bedtime - 50 gm starter, 100 gm water, 100 gm higrade flour and left it overnight. made hot water soaker with grains and salt and left overnight. in the morning mixed higrade flour, whole wheat flour plus a little gluten with remaining water and a little honey to get a shaggy dough.  It was drier than I usually make so after about 20 minutes of autolyse I added grain mix and levain on top and left a further 15 minutes before mixing by hand.  1 slap and fold and dough was very tight so the other 3 were stretch and fold only.  Dough was pretty slow but by 6 pm had risen nicely and doubled. pre shaped aand left it while we had dinner, then final shape and into frige overnight. baked direct from fridge this morning in DO.  Really happy with this, its always good but this time was a bit better than usual.

hubby with one of the 550 gm loaves - he'd eat it all if he had half a chance :)

 

900 gm loaf sliced for freezing

 

 

Leslie

 

 

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Starter Ratios - Which to Use and When?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/49265/starter-ratios-which-use-and-when

Starter Ratios - Which to Use and When?

Submitted by philm63 on September 27, 2016 - 12:33pm.

First post (other than the intro, of course...) and appropriately I'll start with, well, starters!

Me? I grew up in the Bay Area and was basically raised on San Francisco sourdough bread - love the stuff - very firm sourness most times. Mom always had a starter in the fridge. I never knew what that was all about until now. 

Recently I started reading up and decided to get a starter going. It took a few weeks but now I have one and it is going strong. It began its life the first week of July and I've made a few loaves from it already. Now it's time to step my game up.

Quick note about me; I am an electrical engineer (also a homebrewer so fermentation is very interesting to me) and I like things highly technical so don't pull any punches.

So, when making my levain for an upcoming loaf (or two), I'd normally take the 1L Cambro of culture (mother) out of the fridge and let it come to room temperature, draw a small amount into another 1L Cambro (these containers are great! Cheap, too!), feed with a 1:1:1, wait a day, repeat, and commence with the making of the bread. Don't worry; I weight everything!

My question is this; what if I went to a 1:2:2 or even higher ratio for my levain? What are the advantages of these different ratios/hydration levels? Assuming all King Arthur AP flour (yes, I know; time to start playing with different flours - WW, Rye, etc. Ah the learning curve...), how would different ratios affect the final product?

I'm looking at getting a handle on acid production here - I like a firm bite in sourdough and I'd like to be able to achieve this in my bread. 

 

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Latest on The Rye Baker blog: "Closing Time" Dark Caraway Rye

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/49264/latest-rye-baker-blog-closing-time-dark-caraway-rye

Latest on The Rye Baker blog: "Closing Time" Dark Caraway Rye

Submitted by Elagins on September 27, 2016 - 12:17pm.

There’s nothing subtle about this bread: it's a happy marriage of pungent caraway astringency and an intense, well-balanced sour that stands up to anything. You'll find the full post here.

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