January 3rd, 2018

Batch sizes and hydration

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54795/batch-sizes-and-hydration

Batch sizes and hydration

Submitted by LevaiNation on January 2, 2018 - 7:35pm.

Oh The fresh Loaf. My fave place in the interwebz!

Questions questions...

I work my bread in 12qt. cambros. 4 loaves (2k flour) at a time. Recently I got a new bigger oven and have been trying to duplicate my production so I tried making 4 kilo batches,  8 loaves at a time. But with that amount of dough in a cambro, I found it hard to stretch and fold, to turn the dough, and somehow it feels way wetter than I'm used to. I'm going for 72% hydration (I'm in the tropics), but I'm thinking I might need to go lower...

Do bigger batches require different ratios? This dough feels very watery. Perhaps having relatively less exposed surface vs the heart of the dough holding all the water makes a big difference. 

Anyone trying to do such big batches by hand? Tips?

 

Gracias camaradas,

Bryan

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First bake for 2018

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54797/first-bake-2018

First bake for 2018

Submitted by leslieruf on January 2, 2018 - 11:38pm.

Decided to mill some spelt and rye and use it in a simple 1:2:3 loaf and concentrate on open crumb and great oven spring.  My flour mix was 70% bread flour, 20% freshly milled rye and 10% freshly milled spelt.  

 I started off with a starter build of 1:2:3 late sunday afternoon.  Monday morning I built further 1:2:2 intending to use water at about 30°C but misjudged it and when I mixed it up it was more like 26°c. This was left at room temperature to mature.  Room temp started at 23°c.

 At 11 am mixed flours and water and left to autolyse until I was ready to carry on.  2 pm room temperature was 27°c, levain was ready so added the salt and levain to dough using Trevor Wilson’s gentle method.  left it to rest 15 minutes and did another round of gentle stretch and folds which were then repeated hourly (3 times) with a final one half an hour later before dividing and preshaping dough. After 30 minutes did final shape and placed in bannetons then retarded over night. Baked this morning at 230°c straight from fridge. One batard with 2 slashes, one with a single.  

 It is frustrating - it all went well but whilst I got a little oven spring, the dough spread more than I wanted!  Tastes really good though.  

 

Question #1:  did I not build enough dough strength? (was going to check for window pane but forgot)

Question #2:  is this a result of using freshly milled grain?  should I have reduced hydration a little - loving being able to mill grain with my Mockmill100 but still learning about how freshly milled grain responds.

Leslie

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Starter Survey - Market Researcher Turns Bread Baker

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54799/starter-survey-market-researcher-turns-bread-baker

Starter Survey - Market Researcher Turns Bread Baker

Submitted by BreadBabies on January 3, 2018 - 3:38am.

There is a lot of subjectivity and a wide range of information online about what constitutes an "active" starter.

In Trevor J Wilson's Book, Open Crumb Mastery, p. 238, he states that beginners often misjudge their starters to be active. According to Trevor, the rate of rise is the most telling factor. He goes on to describe what he considers workable times and volumes. (Pick up a copy of his e-book at www.breadwerx.com.  It's a fabulous read.)

I've decided to put on my old marketing research hat and create a survey about starters. I think it would be very interesting to survey a large volume of bakers and see how active the yeast is.  Most of us pick up nuggets here and there on the internet or in a book about how much our starters should grow in x amount of time. I know, I know, there are many MANY factors here, everything is relative, and there is only so much we can quantify. However, that never stops us from trying and if we get enough responses to this survey, the data set as a whole can start to give us a broad picture about what active means.

Anybody who takes the survey will have full access to the answers for as long as the survey is up and running.  (I really hope the baking veterans here will participate. We need your responses!)

Here is the link to the survey. (It's a google form so you can feel safe about clicking on it.)

https://goo.gl/forms/J22p8cQYsXX65I133

Be sure to bookmark/save the link with the spreadsheet results after you've taken the survey. That way, you can return to it over and over again and see new responses as they come in.

P.S. I have very specifically asked questions in a certain way and in a certain order. When doing this type of research, we're always striving to balance a lot of things -- succinctness vs. specification, length vs. detail, etc. There are many other areas I could have probed and didn't.  That being said, if you find anything confusing or gaping holes in the questions, do let me know. I have no pride of authorship and surveys are always biased by the survey writer to some extent.

 

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How much yeast, is it too much?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54800/how-much-yeast-it-too-much

How much yeast, is it too much?

Submitted by ayukwardhanie on January 3, 2018 - 3:47am.

i just found an italian bomboloni recipe originally calls for brewer's yeast (40g brewer's yeast for 1000g flour, proofed overnight on fridge). i am thinking of substituting with baker's yeast since it is almost impossible to find one in my country. i'm planning to make half of the recipe (500g flour) with 10g baker's yeast (less than half, as an article that i found stated). question is, is 10g baker's yeast too much for 500g flour (with overnight proof on fridge)? 

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Anyone got a mill in Brooklyn?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54801/anyone-got-mill-brooklyn

Anyone got a mill in Brooklyn?

Submitted by itheory on January 3, 2018 - 7:34am.

 

Greetings fellow bakers.

I made a mistake last month. I took advantage of a free shipping deal on edenfoods.com to order 10 5lb bags of hard red spring wheat flour. Only when it arrived, I discovered that I had inadvertently ordered wheat berries, not flour. This is disappointing because I don’t have a mill. Eden will take it back, but the return shipping would be higher than the cost of the flour!

https://www.edenfoods.com/store/hard-red-spring-wheat-100-whole-grain-organic-5-lb.html

Now I have to figure out what to do with 50lb of berries! Has anyone got a mill in Brooklyn? Not sure I could lug 50lb of flour anywhere on the subway, but if someone wanted to buy the berries, or otherwise help me get them milled into flour in exchange for some of the berries, please do get in touch!

Thanks,

David

 

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Central Milling Organic Type 70 Malted Flour

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54802/central-milling-organic-type-70-malted-flour

Central Milling Organic Type 70 Malted Flour

Submitted by Ricko on January 3, 2018 - 9:10am.

Hello All,

I've run across some reviews as of late and recipes where some bakers rave about this flour for its finished taste. I live in Michigan which has limited my flour choices at my local grocery store. I have been using KA bread and AP flours for many years and do like their flour. But for a change up and something new to try I can order a couple of 5# bags of the Central Milling flour , although it seems I'd have to give my first born son for shipping costs! I'd like to ask those of you who have tried this Central Milling flour if you really like it and think it's the bee's knees as compared to KA flours? It would be for sourdough loaves. Thank you for your response.

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Chasing thin, crispy, not thick/tough dough

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54803/chasing-thin-crispy-not-thicktough-dough

Chasing thin, crispy, not thick/tough dough

Submitted by Jim Burgin on January 3, 2018 - 9:18am.

For a year, I have been the route with the best books, internet sites, conversations with authorities (King Arthur); have altered everything you can name (hydration, baking temperature, Pizza store and Lodge pot, spraying and not, baking time, etc. etc. etc.  AND, STILL produce thick, chewy (trip to the dentist) crust!  After trying all the best books/methods, I am now finally going simple (Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day).  Does anyone know what REALLY works for thin, crispy crust???  Thanks much.  Jim Burgin 

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