January 4th, 2018

Maurizio's 50-50 WW, alfanso style

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54804/maurizios-5050-ww-alfanso-style

Maurizio's 50-50 WW, alfanso style

Submitted by alfanso on January 3, 2018 - 4:52pm.

Other than on his The Perfect Loaf site, I can’t remember where I saw Maurizio’s 50-50 WW SD posted by anyone.  I warehoused the formula until this week.  Not being a big fan of bread that leans too heavily on WW, I was cautious about this one.  I generally find that they taste a little too “earthy” for me.  I decided to tinker with this a bit.  I added ~12% chopped figs and ~12% pecans to the dough on the first Letter Fold.  And therefore Maurizio’s 50-50 WW became Alfanso’s 50-50 WW with figs and pecans.

Maurizio uses a combination of higher gluten AP flours than I do, but my KA WW has a little more protein than his Guisto’s Stoneground WW does, so all in all, it seems to be a somewhat even trade.  Mixing this by hand with French Folds yields an unsurprisingly super slack dough.  It comes in at ~89% hydration, a region that I've rarely ever visited, or even come anywhere close to. And it took the majority of the 5 Letter Folds to tighten up.  Into retard and then a late night shaping where the dough was much more cooperative. but still quite wet and slack.

From experience I know that I generally do not get a big grigne from oven spring nor much of an open crumb when there is a rather large quantity of fruit & nuts.  And especially when there is high hydration, as this monster has.  The additions to the dough have a tendency to weigh the dough down and interrupt what would probably be a more open crumb.  So there was some initial disappointment in the mid-bake outcome when I released the steam - until I remembered those few minor, but important details.

It is a lovely bread with a nice crispy crust and a soft crumb.  The figs were added to provide some sweetness to the mix, but they should have been chopped up smaller.  I may visit this bread very soon again, next time without the fruit or nuts.  I’m curious as to how the final product will play out and whether I can attain some of the beauty that Maurizio produces for his bread.

 

 

 

 

These were pretty big batards for me.  The smaller was ~600g and the larger ~1000g (and there's a reason for that).

One funny shaping incident: I originally shaped 3 baguettes and the smaller batard, couched them, and then went to retard.  Somewhere about a half hour later I realized that the baguettes were not the best solution for so much additive.  And so the retarded dough was un-retarded, the 3 baguette were un-couched, balled together and then reformed and shaped into the larger batard before going back on the couche to join the other.  A little crazed, but it seemed to work.

Twitter Facebook

What are the special qualities of the best online essay writing services?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54805/what-are-special-qualities-best-online-essay-writing-services

What are the special qualities of the best online essay writing services?

January 3, 2018 - 9:23pm
wilson1's picture
wilson1

Description

Once use this service the students will ready to use their best skill to complete the any academic task. This online service is helps to student get top-level skills and intelligence. This essay organization offers a wide range of content writing services. This service provides with proficient and enthusiastic writers. They make qualified essays and another academic works for students. Their service is able to produced top quality service to students, and they are providing by Well-versed content writers and editors. The essay qualities are maintained by effective quality control system. They have many years of experience in essay writing. They hire only experienced academic writers to deliver high quality writing. They are able to write a unique essay successfully the best online essay writing service is delivering a high-quality writing service to customers. The writing service checks each paper for plagiarism and originality. Your problem can only be easily resolved if the student accepts help from this writing administration. Their excellent staffs assigned any task is carefully checked for grammar, spelling or language errors and make it perfectly. This essay service is well familiar with writing essays on different academic level for example High school essays, College essays, and University essays. Our Skilled writers ready to help you through high school, college and university. Read more: http://www.bestonlineessaywritingservices.com

Summary

Yield
Servings
Prep time
Cooking time
Total time

Ingredients

Instructions

ISO Baker’s percentages for artisanal crackers

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54806/iso-baker%E2%80%99s-percentages-artisanal-crackers

ISO Baker’s percentages for artisanal crackers

Submitted by JustJoel on January 3, 2018 - 9:49pm.

I've found a few good artisinal cracker recipes on the web, and a few in my cook books, but I‘ll be darned if I can find a basic baker’s percentage! Most of the recipes I’ve researched vary widely in the amounts of basic ingredients, so the ratios are different for each recipe. A formula would invaluable, as I’m eager to create my own crackers (now that I’ve completely mastered the art of bread. Not).

my thanks for any help you can give!

Twitter Facebook

ISO Baker’s percentages for artisanal crackers

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54807/iso-baker%E2%80%99s-percentages-artisanal-crackers

ISO Baker’s percentages for artisanal crackers

Submitted by JustJoel on January 3, 2018 - 9:49pm.

I've found a few good artisinal cracker recipes on the web, and a few in my cook books, but I‘ll be darned if I can find a basic baker’s percentage! Most of the recipes I’ve researched vary widely in the amounts of basic ingredients, so the ratios are different for each recipe. A formula would invaluable, as I’m eager to create my own crackers (now that I’ve completely mastered the art of bread. Not).

my thanks for any help you can give!

Twitter Facebook

Quick leaven?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54808/quick-leaven

Quick leaven?

Submitted by TheBrickLayer on January 4, 2018 - 6:16am.

I've been having some success with a "quick leaven," one that passes the float test in about three hours as opposed to after an overnight ferment. All I did was triple the amount of starter I put into the leaven build. That gives me a good, float-y sponge in a relatively short amount of time. 

To be honest, I think I'm having *better* results than I do with a mature overnight leaven. I believe the yeasts in this leaven are not nearly as exhausted as those in an overnight one. I get more rise in my bulk ferment and proofing, and a more subtle and tasty flavor after an overnight proof in the fridge. 

I'm posting because I'm wondering why more people don't do this? Either way works fine, of course---quick or overnight. But there seem to be apparent benefits to doing it this way. Yet I've seen vanishingly few recipes that advise such an approach. Is there something I'm missing about it?

Twitter Facebook

Sourdough Bagel Crumb

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54809/sourdough-bagel-crumb

Sourdough Bagel Crumb

Submitted by PalwithnoovenP on January 4, 2018 - 7:59am.

Hello TFLers! I hope you're on to a  great start for 2018. Some photos failed to upload in my last post, as promised here they are.







 
Bagels from another angle.





 

Another crumb shot with schmear.

 
I love cheese pimiento (that's how we call pimento cheese) so I schmeared some. This particular spread was made with Edam, a bit of mayo and home-roasted bell peppers. I think pimento cream cheese will be good on these and will be my favorite.



Turned into a sandwich. I love to eat it this way instead of a half at a time because you maximize it's toothsome texture. So satisfying! Why have I only made them now, years after a failed first attempt; they're deliciousness was just a recent discovery for me. Perhaps bagels are the bread of this year for me. I'm so excited to try different flavor combinations!


 

Ready for New Year's Eve Dinner.

I paired them with these:

A simple tuna pasta with white sauce.

And our infamous sweet spaghetti. I did not put cut-up hotdogs this time because I could not find them but our spaghetti always has them. :)

 
The bagels go well with both and makes the meal much more filling. I hope you enjoyed this post. Happy baking!

Twitter Facebook

Sharp knife vs scoring lame?

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54810/sharp-knife-vs-scoring-lame

Sharp knife vs scoring lame?

Submitted by Louie413 on January 4, 2018 - 8:12am.

First off I wanna thank everyone on the site for their input and knowledge.  I've been lurking quite a while, taking notes and applying it to my bread/pizza making. To the point, I've not manage to score correctly enough to get an ear on my sourdough loaves. I've tried with a unity razor blade, sharp knife, cerrated knife etc, cutting at what I think is a 30 deg angle but to no avail. Do I really need to shell out some money on a scoring lame? I own a seriously sharp spyderco and sebenza 21 that have no problem scoring the dough,  it's seems like I'm not hitting the right angle or locations? 

Twitter Facebook

If you were to design a bread machine...

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54811/if-you-were-design-bread-machine

If you were to design a bread machine...

Submitted by JustJoel on January 4, 2018 - 10:20am.

I really love my bread machine. No, seriously! I whisper sweet nothings into its vent while it’s kneading my pain au lait. But I have noticed some shortcomings. Nothing big enough to toss the machine; I don’t have room in my kitchen for my stand mixer, arthritis keeps me from prolonged kneading, and the food processor just seems inelegant; I don’t want to kill the dough, just mix and knead it!

Here are the things I would include were I designing a bread machine:

  • An internal light. I have to keep a flashlight near the machine so I can check the dough without opening the lid
  • A larger, backlit display
  • A programmable dough cycle. Using the mix cycle and turning the machine on and off is a PITA
  • Bluetooth or WiFi, and an app, so I can program and control the machine remotely (as in - from my throne in the living room!)
  • Larger, less cryptic icons to display the progression of the cycle. I have no idea what a tiny little square with clouds coming out of it means!
  • A display that gives the remaining time for each step in the cycle, as well as one showing the remaining time for the entire cycle. 
  • A ”beep” in the dough cycle to indicate when to add extra ingredient. All the other cycles on my machine have it, why not the dough cycle?

How would you design a bread machine?

Twitter Facebook

Problem resting/proofing shaped loaves

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54812/problem-restingproofing-shaped-loaves

Problem resting/proofing shaped loaves

Submitted by HeroOfThePeople on January 4, 2018 - 10:44am.

I've been baking for a couple of years but got serious about it and switched to sourdough a few months ago so far things are great but I'm trying to identify what might be an issue with my process that's effecting my results.

Everything I've read from Peter Reinheart, Josey Baker, Chad Robertson, Ken Forkish, etc calls for either a short 10-20 min rest, or more commonly a second proofing after shaping loaves, usually until it passes the poke test.  When I do this I get a relatively flat loaf with a denser crumb, no big holes or tunnels and not a lot of oven spring.  Conversely when I shape my loaves, slash them, and put them straight into the oven I get much better results, more oven spring, more open crumb, taller loaves.  What's the story here, why are my results counter to what all the experts are telling me to do?

I'm doing a fairly basic 1-2-3 sourdough, 1 part starter, 2 parts water, 3 parts flour by mass, +0.5-2% of the flour weight in salt depending.  My starter is kept room temp at 80% hydration and fed bread flour twice a day at this point (Started with rye transitioned to bread flour over the course of a week when the starter was a month old).  I use tap water from the municipal well, the water is slightly hard, but not overly so.  For flour it varies but usually either 100% bread flour or 80/20 bread flour & either spelt or rye.  Prep the levan first thing in the morning, about 4 hrs later mix the dough in my stand mixer (speed 1 for 2 min, speed 2 for 4-8 min until the dough is smooth, coming away from the bowl, and windowpanes.  Proof until doubled, sometimes in the fridge sometimes on the counter.  Shape into loaves either batards or boules.  Then either rest/second proof, or not followed by baking.  Boules get baked in a dutch oven, batards on a baking steel with water added to a hot sheet pan underneath for steam.

Any thoughts?

Twitter Facebook

Amber Waves of Grain, 2018

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54816/amber-waves-grain-2018

Amber Waves of Grain, 2018

Submitted by alfanso on January 4, 2018 - 1:09pm.

Last year I kicked off the year with two entries of 2016 in review.  The first was baguettes I baked, and the second was the batards.  This year I thought that I'd document a slew of selected baguettes from my favorite viewing angle.  Some are repeats from last year as this is not a 2017 review.  With few exceptions, all are different breads.

Twitter Facebook

System maintenance 4-7ish Pacific Time today

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54817/system-maintenance-47ish-pacific-time-today

System maintenance 4-7ish Pacific Time today

Submitted by Floydm on January 4, 2018 - 2:48pm.

I have some system maintenance I need to do here, so I am going to put the site into "read-only" mode in a bit. You should still be able to browse and read all of the existing site content, but you'll be prevented from creating new posts or comments for an hour or two here. 

Twitter Facebook

Photos

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54818/photos

Photos

Submitted by plevee on January 4, 2018 - 3:12pm.

Just a suggestion, Floyd. Would it be possible to be able to simply drag and drop photos from the computer desktop when posting? Like Facebook and other sites. I've never managed the 'little tree/URL' thingy (being old and illiterate). 

Patsy

Twitter Facebook